Icelandic Horses

As we drove through Iceland, we noticed several farms with Icelandic horses grazing amidst beautiful landscapes. We also noticed folks stopping their vehicles to checkout the Icelandic horses, which were more looking like ponies. So, we also stopped our Chevy to spend some time to click some photos and take a video clip. Check out my footage below, and also some trivia curated from the Wiki

The Icelandic horse is a breed of horse developed in Iceland. Although the horses are small, at times pony-sized, most breed registries for the Icelandic refer to it as a horse. The Icelandic displays two gaits in addition to the typical walk, trot, and canter/gallop commonly displayed by other breeds. The only breed of horse in Iceland, they are also popular internationally, and sizable populations exist in Europe and North America.

Developed from ponies taken to Iceland by Norse settlers in the 9th and 10th centuries, the breed is mentioned in literature and historical records throughout Icelandic history; the first reference to a named horse appears in the 12th century.    In the 1780s, much of the breed was wiped out in the aftermath of a volcanic eruption at Laki

Icelandic horses weigh between 330 and 380 kilograms and stand an average of between 132 and 142 cm high, which is often considered pony size, but breeders and breed registries always refer to Icelandics as horses. Several theories have been put forward as to why Icelandics are always called horses, among them the breed’s spirited temperament and large personality.  Another theory suggests that the breed’s weight, bone structure and weight-carrying abilities mean it can be classified as a horse, rather than a pony. 

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